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Moses

$99
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3D Model Specifications
Product ID:573561
Published:
Geometry:Polygonal
Polygons:1,994,619
Vertices:1,000,216
Textures:No
Materials:Yes
Rigged:No
Animated:No
UV Mapped:Yes
Unwrapped UVs:Unknown
Artist
TurboSquid Member Since July 2004
Currently sells 20 products
Achievements:
Product Rating
1 Rating Submitted
DigitalEnsemble
May 21, 2011
For the price it''s hard to complain! There were two main issues, the walls had some normal/vert issues, and the right arm isn''t really modeled (modeler assumes wall will hide that part). Other than that, it''s really nice, especially for the price!
Description
This is my version of Michelangelo's Moses very high porigons and detailed.

The Moses (c. 1513–1515) is a masterpiece of High Renaissance sculpture by the renowned artist Michelangelo Buonarroti, housed in the church of San Pietro in Vincoli in Rome. The sculpture was commissioned in 1505 by Pope Julius II for his tomb. This famous work of art depicts the Biblical figure Moses with horns on his head, symbolic of wisdom and enlightenment.

The marble sculpture depicts Moses with horns (tongs of fire according to the bible) on his head. This was the normal medieval Western depiction of Moses, based on the description of Moses' face as 'cornuta' ('horned', though other meanings are possible) in the Latin Vulgate translation of Exodus 34:29-35 [2]. The Greek Septuagint [3] and Hebrew Masoretic texts[4] use words meaning 'radiant', suggesting an effect like a halo, though it has been argued that the Hebrew text remains unclear as to the original sense intended. Horns were symbolic of authority in ancient Near Eastern culture, and the medieval depiction had the advantage of giving Moses a convenient attribute by which he could easily be recognized in crowded pictures.

According to Giorgio Vasari in his Life of Michelangelo, the Jews of Rome came like 'flocks of starlings' to admire the statue every Shabat.
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