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Zenith Flashmatic TV

$19
or
Royalty Free License
- Editorial Uses Allowed
Extended Uses May Need Clearances
The intellectual property depicted in this model, including the brand "zenith", is not affiliated with or endorsed by the original rights holders. Editorial uses of this product are allowed, but other uses (such as within computer games) may require legal clearances from third party intellectual property owners. Learn more.
Included Formats
Maya 7.0 mental ray
Softimage 3.5
3ds Max 7.0
Lightwave 6.5
Cinema 4D 9
OBJ N/A
3D Studio N/A
Zenith_Texture.zip

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3D Model Specifications
Product ID:456723
Published:
Geometry:Polygonal
Polygons:9,972
Vertices:9,972
Textures:Yes
Materials:Yes
Rigged:No
Animated:No
UV Mapped:Yes
Unwrapped UVs:Yes, overlapping
Artist
TurboSquid Member Since August 2003
Currently sells 690 products
Achievements:
Product Rating
Unrated
Categories

Legal Notice: The intellectual property depicted in this model, including the brand "zenith", is not affiliated with or endorsed by the original rights holders.

Description
Description:

A detailed model of a 1955 Zenith Flashmatic TV

Texture:

Color Maps and Bump Maps are provided. Textures are 2048 x 2048 resolution. Original .psd of the said textures are also included.

History:

Zenith is, perhaps, best known for the first practical wireless TV remote control, the Space Command, developed in 1956. The original TV remote control was a wired version, released in 1950, that soon attracted complaints about an unsightly length of cable from the viewer's chair to the TV set. Cmdr. Eugene F. McDonald, Zenith President and Founder, ordered his engineers to develop a wireless version, but the use of radio waves was soon discounted due to poor interference rejection inherent in 1950s radio receivers. The 1955 Flash-Matic remote system used a highly directional photo flash tube in the hand held unit that was aimed at sensitive photoreceivers in the four front corners of the TV cabinet. However, bright sunlight falling on the TV was found to activate the controls.

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