Special Offer! Off

:::
Selected items only. See more offers in My Account.

Iwo Jima Battle Flag 3D

$10
or
Royalty Free License
- All Extended Uses
Included Formats
3ds Max MAX 2012 Default Scanline
Other
Other
3D Studio
Collada
FBX
Other
OBJ
Other
Other
Other
Other
Other

Complete Confidence

Have questions? Chat with us now.

Live Chat Now 24/7
3D Model Specifications
Product ID:1208984
Published:
Geometry:Polygonal Quads/Tris
Polygons:6,747
Vertices:3,440
Textures:Yes
Materials:Yes
Rigged:No
Animated:Yes
UV Mapped:Yes
Unwrapped UVs:Yes, non-overlapping
Artist
TurboSquid Member Since October 2004
Currently sells 179 products
Achievements:
Product Rating
Unrated
Description
Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima is an iconic photograph taken by Joe Rosenthal on February 23, 1945, which depicts six United States Marines raising a U.S. flag atop Mount Suribachi, during the Battle of Iwo Jima, in World War II.

The photograph was first published in Sunday newspapers on February 25, 1945. It was extremely popular and was reprinted in thousands of publications. Later, it became the only photograph to win the Pulitzer Prize for Photography in the same year as its publication, and came to be regarded in the United States as one of the most significant and recognizable images of the war.

Three Marines in the photograph, Sergeant Michael Strank, Corporal Harlon Block ,and Private First Class Franklin Sousley were killed in action over the next few days. The other three surviving flag-raisers in the photograph were Corporals (then Private First Class) Rene Gagnon, Ira Hayes, and Harold Schultz. Both men originally misidentified as flag raisers had helped raise a smaller flag about 90 minutes earlier, and were both still on the mountaintop and witnessed but were not part of the specific moment of raising the larger flag that was captured in the Pulitzer Prize-winning photo.
The image was later used by Felix de Weldon to sculpt the Marine Corps War Memorial, which was dedicated in 1954 to all Marines who died for their country and is located in Arlington Ridge Park, near the Ord-Weitzel Gate to Arlington National Cemetery and the Netherlands Carillon.

This is the 2nd Flag that was raised on Mt Suribachi. A high res photo was used of the actual flag for the texture map.

The flags from the first and second flag-raisings are conserved in the National Museum of the Marine Corps; the second flag, pictured here, was damaged by the high winds at the peak of Suribachi (American flags during World War II had 48 stars, since Alaska and Hawaii were not yet U.S. states).

Texture is 4096 x 4096 and comes with MAXs cloth simulation.
Related Products
More Products by Artist