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maltose

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3D Model Specifications
Product ID:525797
Published:
Geometry:Polygonal
Polygons:44,580
Vertices:23,162
Textures:Yes
Materials:Yes
Rigged:No
Animated:No
UV Mapped:Yes
Unwrapped UVs:Unknown
Artist
TurboSquid Member Since December 2009
Currently sells 525 products
Achievements:
Product Rating
Unrated
Description
This is a ready to go out-of-box molecule, It is 100% accurate to the real chemical structure, Real scientific data was used as a reference to the construction of this model. The colors of the elements are the scientific standard used for identification.

Maltose, or malt sugar, is a disaccharide formed from two units of glucose joined with an ?(1?4)bond. The isomer isomaltose has two glucose molecules linked through an ?(1?6) bond. Maltose is the second member of an important biochemical series of glucose chains. Maltose is the disaccharide produced when amylase breaks down starch. It is found in germinating seeds such as Barley as they break down their starch stores to use for food.

The addition of another glucose unit yields maltotriose; further additions will produce dextrins (also called maltodextrins) and eventually starch (glucose polymer).

Maltose can be broken down into two glucose molecules by hydrolysis. In living organisms, the enzyme maltase can achieve this very rapidly. In the laboratory, heating with a strong acid for several minutes will produce the same result. Isomaltose is broken by isomaltase.

The production of maltose from germinating cereals, such as barley, is an important part of the brewing process. When barley is malted, it is brought into a condition in which the concentration of maltose-producing amylases has been maximized. Mashing is the process by which these amylases convert the cereal's starches into maltose. Metabolism of maltose by yeast during fermentation then leads to the production of ethanol and carbon dioxide.
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