Willys Jeep

Royalty Free License
- Editorial Uses Allowed
Extended Uses May Need Clearances
The intellectual property depicted in this model, including the brand "willys-overland motors", is not affiliated with or endorsed by the original rights holders. Editorial uses of this product are allowed, but other uses (such as within computer games) may require legal clearances from third party intellectual property owners. Learn more.
Included Formats
Maya 7.0 mental ray
Softimage 3.5
3ds Max 7.0
Lightwave 6.5
Cinema 4D 9
OBJ N/A
3DS N/A
WILLYS_JEEP_EXT.zip

Don't see the file format you need?

Free File Format Conversion

Have questions? Chat with us now.

Live Chat Now 24/7
3D Model Specifications
Product ID:455700
Published:
Geometry:Polygonal
Polygons:329,533
Vertices:333,062
Textures:Yes
Materials:Yes
Rigged:No
Animated:No
UV Mapped:Yes
Unwrapped UVs:Unknown
Artist
TurboSquid Member Since August 2003
Currently sells 753 products
Achievements:
Product Rating
1 Rating Submitted
Categories

Legal Notice: The intellectual property depicted in this model, including the brand "willys-overland motors", is not affiliated with or endorsed by the original rights holders.

Tags
Description
Description

A detailed model of a Willy's Jeep, parented and pivoted for animation purposes.

Texture

Texture and Color Maps are provided. Textures are 2048 x 2048 resolution. Original .psd of the said textures are also included. Texture is based on the original olive drab color.

History

During World War I there were limited attempts to mechanize military forces. The US Army had already used 4x4 trucks in it, supplied by the Four Wheel Drive Auto Co., by the time World War II was dawning, the United States Department of War was still seeking a standardized light cross-country and reconnaissance vehicle.

As tensions were heightening around the world in the late Thirties, the US Army put the word out to American automobile manufacturers to come up with suggestions to replace its existing, aging light motor vehicles, mostly motorcycles and sidecars but also someModel T's. This resulted in several prototypes being presented to army officials, like five Marmon-Herrington 4x4s in 1937, and three Austin roadsters by American Bantam in 1938 (Fowler, 1993). However, the US Army's requirements were not formalised until July 11, 1940, when 135 U.S. automotive manufacturers were approached to submit a design conforming to their specifications, for a vehicle the World War II training manual TM 9-803 described as '... a general purpose, personnel, or cargo carrier especially adaptable for reconnaissance or command, and designated as 1/4-ton 4x4 Truck.'

Related Products
More Products by Artist