IBM Sequoia Supercomputer

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Included Formats
Jul 17, 2013
CheckMate Lite Certified
3ds Max 2010 V-Ray

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3D Model Specifications
Product ID:751632
Published:
Geometry:Polygonal Quads/Tris
Polygons:14,168
Vertices:17,710
Textures:Yes
Materials:Yes
Rigged:No
Animated:No
UV Mapped:Yes
Unwrapped UVs:No
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TurboSquid Member Since May 2003
Currently sells 299 products
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Legal Notice: The intellectual property depicted in this model, including the brand "ibm", is not affiliated with or endorsed by the original rights holders.

Description
IBM Sequoia System Supercomputer

IBM Sequoia System Supercomputer, modelled in 3ds Max 2010 and rendered with V-Ray 1.5. All materials, textures and V-Ray lighting are included.

No Photoshop or post-production was used for the preview renders. Buy this product, open file and click to render!

About the IBM Sequoia System Supercomputer
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IBM Sequoia is a petascale Blue Gene/Q supercomputer constructed by IBM for the National Nuclear Security Administration as part of the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC). It was delivered to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in 2011 and was fully deployed in June 2012.

On 14 June 2012, the TOP500 Project Committee announced that Sequoia replaced the K computer as the world's fastest supercomputer, with a LINPACK performance of 16.32 petaflops, 55% faster than the K computer's 10.51 petaflops, having 123% more cores than the K computer's 705,024 cores. Sequoia is also more energy efficient, as it consumes 7.9 MW, 37% less than the K computer's 12.6 MW.

In January 2013, the Sequoia sets the record for the first supercomputer using more than one million computing cores at a time for a single application. The Stanford Engineering's Center for Turbulence Research (CTR) used it to solve a complex fluid dynamics problem — the prediction of noise generated by a supersonic jet engine.
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