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Vought V-173 / XF5U-1

Editorial Uses Allowed
Extended Uses May Need Clearances
The brand 'vought' has been associated with this product. Editorial uses of this product are allowed, but other uses (such as within computer games) may require legal clearances from third party intellectual property owners. Learn more.
Included Formats
Maya 7.0 Default Scanline
Cinema 4D 10 Default Scanline
Lightwave 6.5 Default Scanline
3ds Max 7.0 Default Scanline
Softimage 3.5 Default Scanline
3DS N/A
OBJ N/A
Other Files
V-173_EXT.zip
3D Model Specifications
Product ID:555729
Published:
Geometry:Polygonal Quads/Tris
Polygons:23,662
Vertices:24,071
Textures:Yes
Materials:Yes
Rigged:No
Animated:No
UV Mapped:Yes
Unwrapped UVs:Yes, overlapping
Artist
TurboSquid Member Since August 2003
Currently sells 704 products
Achievements:
1 Rating Submitted
Product Rating
Description
A detailed, textured 3D model of a Vought V-173 / XF5U-1 'Flying Pancake'

Textures

Detailed textures are provided including diffuse, bump. Maximum dimension of textures are 4096 pixels. Photoshop template files are available for download with the product so you can modify the layered textures to your liking.

History

One of the most unusual aircraft ever designed for the U.S. Navy was the Chance Vought V-173, also known as the Zimmerman 'Flying Pancake'. It was a prototype 'proof of concept' aircraft that lacked wings, instead relying on its flat circular body to provide the lifting surface. This multi-million dollar project nearly became the first V/STOL (vertical takeoff and landing) fighter. The V-173 blueprints were shown to the Navy in 1939, with wind tunnel tests on full scale models being done in 1940-41. In January 1942 BuAer requested the proposal for two prototype airplanes of an experimental version of the V-173, known as the VS-135. This version had more powerful engines and was given the military designation XF5U-1. Flight testing of the V-173 went on through 1942 and 1943, resulting in reports of 'flying saucers' from surprised Connecticut locals. Mock-ups of the XF5U-1 were done in the summer of 1943, but due to Vought's preoccupation with the Corsair and Kingfisher, the program proceeded slowly during the war. The arrival of the jet age saw the cancellation of the XF5U-1 contract by the Navy in March 1947, despite the fact that the aircraft was due to take its first test flight later that year. The XF5U-1 prototype was scrapped, though the V-173 prototype was saved and was given to the Smithsonian. To this day the V-173 / XF5U-1 project remains one of the more interesting anecdotes in aviation history.

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