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Viking-Warrior_Rigged_Max

All Extended Uses
Included Formats
3ds Max 7
3ds Max Textures
3D Model Specifications
Product ID:459194
Published:
Geometry:Polygonal
Polygons:4,660
Vertices:4,536
Textures:Yes
Materials:Yes
Rigged:Yes
Animated:Yes
UV Mapped:Unknown
Unwrapped UVs:Unknown
Artist
TurboSquid Member Since September 2002
Currently sells 1630 products
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1 Rating Submitted
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Description
High detail low-impact Viking Warrior figure (rigged). Rational poly-count suitable for 'next-generation' games. Very high level of detail also suitable for high-end render work. Part of a huge related model collection available from ES3DStudios.

Figure comes rigged in 3DSMax (Character Studio). Other formats are available on request unrigged. Max version is animated through a series of fixed poses, and includes basic jaw rigging.

********* Textures in 2nd zip download *************

Includes choice of eye colour, plus mouth interior and alpha mapped teeth and beard. Axe, sword and sheild also included. Helmet can be removed - full head underneath.


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The period from the earliest recorded raids in the 790s until the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 is commonly known as the Viking Age of Scandinavian history. The Normans, however, were descended from Danish Vikings who were given feudal overlordship of areas in northern France — the Duchy of Normandy — in the 8th century. In that respect, descendants of the Vikings continued to have an influence in northern Europe. Likewise, King Harold Godwinson, the last Anglo-Saxon king of England who was killed during the Norman invasion in 1066, had Danish ancestors. Many of the medieval kings of Norway and Denmark married into English and Scottish royalty and occasionally got involved in dynastic disputes.[citation needed]

Geographically, a 'Viking Age' may be assigned not only to Scandinavian lands (modern Denmark, Norway and Sweden), but also to territories under North Germanic dominance, mainly the Danelaw, formerly the Kingdom of Northumbria, parts of Mercia, and East Anglia.[citation needed] Viking navigators opened the road to new lands to the north, west and east, resulting in the foundation of independent settlements in the Shetland, Orkney, and Faroe Islands; Iceland; Greenland;[5] and L'Anse aux Meadows, a short-lived settlement in Newfoundland, circa 1000 A.D.[6] Many of these lands, specifically Greenland and Iceland, may have been originally discovered by sailors blown off course.[citation needed] They also may well have been deliberately sought out, perhaps on the basis of the accounts of sailors who had seen land in the distance. The Greenland settlement eventually died out, possibly due to climate change. Vikings also explored and settled in territories in Slavic-dominated areas of Eastern Europe. By 950 AD these settlements were largely Slavicized.
A reconstructed Viking Age long house

From 839, Varangian mercenaries in the service of the Byzantine Empire, notably Harald Hardrada, campaigned in North Africa, Jerusalem, and other places in the Middle East. Important trading ports during the period include Birka, Hedeby, Kaupang, Jorvik, Staraya Ladoga, Novgorod and Kiev.

There is archaeological evidence that Vikings reached the city of Baghdad, the center of the Islamic Empire.[7] The Norse regularly plied the Volga with their trade goods: furs, tusks, seal fat for boat sealant and slaves. However, they were far less successful in establishing settlements in the Middle East, due to the more centralized Islamic power.[citation needed]

Generally speaking, the Norwegians expanded to the north and west to places such as Ireland, Iceland and Greenland; the Danes to England and France, settling in the Danelaw (northern/eastern England) and Normandy; and the Swedes to the east. These nations, although distinct, were similar in culture and language.

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