Google car

Editorial Uses Allowed
Extended Uses May Need Clearances
The brand 'google' has been associated with this product. Editorial uses of this product are allowed, but other uses (such as within computer games) may require legal clearances from third party intellectual property owners. Learn more.
Included Formats
3ds Max 9 mental ray
3D Model Specifications
Product ID:974405
UV Mapped:No
Unwrapped UVs:No
TurboSquid Member Since September 2007
Currently sells 27 products
Product Rating
The Google Self-Driving Car, commonly abbreviated as SDC, is a project by Google X that involves developing technology for autonomous cars, mainly electric cars. The software powering Google's cars is called Google Chauffeur.[1] Lettering on the side of each car identifies it as a 'self-driving car'. The project is currently being led by Google engineer Sebastian Thrun, former director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and co-inventor of Google Street View. Thrun's team at Stanford created the robotic vehicle Stanley which won the 2005 DARPA Grand Challenge and its US$2 million prize from the United States Department of Defense.[2] The team developing the system consisted of 15 engineers working for Google, including Chris Urmson, Mike Montemerlo, and Anthony Levandowski who had worked on the DARPA Grand and Urban Challenges.[3]

Legislation has been passed in four U.S. states and Washington, D.C. allowing driverless cars. The state of Nevada passed a law on June 29, 2011, permitting the operation of autonomous cars in Nevada, after Google had been lobbying in that state for robotic car laws.[4][5] The Nevada law went into effect on March 1, 2012, and the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles issued the first license for an autonomous car in May 2012, to a Toyota Prius modified with Google's experimental driverless technology.[6] In April 2012, Florida became the second state to allow the testing of autonomous cars on public roads,[7] and California became the third when Governor Jerry Brown signed the bill into law at Google HQ in Mountain View.[8] In December 2013, Michigan became the fourth state to allow testing of driverless cars on public roads.[9] In July 2014, the city of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho adopted a robotics ordinance that includes provisions to allow for self-driving cars.[10]

In May 2014, Google presented a new concept for their driverless car that had neither a steering wheel nor pedals,[11] and unveiled a fully functioning prototype in December of that year that they planned to test on San Francisco Bay Area roads beginning in 2015.[12] Google plans to make these cars available to the public in 2020.[13]
Related Products
More Products by Artist