MQ-1 Predator

All Extended Uses
Included Formats
Maya 2014 Maya Software
Cinema 4D 12 Default Scanline
Lightwave 11 Default Scanline
3ds Max 2010 Default Scanline
3DS
3D Model Specifications
Product ID:859699
Published:
Geometry:Polygonal Quads/Tris
Polygons:59,864
Vertices:58,976
Textures:Yes
Materials:Yes
Rigged:No
Animated:No
UV Mapped:Yes
Unwrapped UVs:Yes, overlapping
Artist
TurboSquid Member Since September 2013
Currently sells 77 products
Achievements:
Unrated
Product Rating
Description
The model is scaled 1:1 complete with high resolution map in proper hierarchy.

Lightwave vertex count: 59120
C4d vertex count: 59120

The General Atomics MQ-1 Predator is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) built by General Atomics and used primarily by the United States Air Force (USAF) and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Initially conceived in the early 1990s for reconnaissance and forward observation roles, the Predator carries cameras and other sensors but has been modified and upgraded to carry and fire two AGM-114 Hellfire missiles or other munitions. The aircraft, in use since 1995, has seen combat over Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bosnia, Serbia, Iraq, Yemen, Libya, Syria, and Somalia.

The USAF describes the Predator as a 'Tier II' MALE UAS (medium-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aircraft system). The UAS consists of four aircraft or 'air vehicles' with sensors, a ground control station (GCS), and a primary satellite link communication suite.[4] Powered by a Rotax engine and driven by a propeller, the air vehicle can fly up to 400 nmi (460 mi; 740 km) to a target, loiter overhead for 14 hours, then return to its base.

Following 2001, the RQ-1 Predator became the primary unmanned aircraft used for offensive operations by the USAF and the CIA in Afghanistan and the Pakistani tribal areas; it has also been deployed elsewhere. Because offensive uses of the Predator are classified, U.S. military officials have reported an appreciation for the intelligence and reconnaissance-gathering abilities of UAVs but declined to publicly discuss their offensive use.[5]

Civilian applications have included border enforcement and scientific studies, and to monitor wind direction and other characteristics of large forest fires (such as the one that was used by the California Air National Guard in the August 2013 Rim Fire).[6]
Related Products
More Products by Artist